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ECB Keeps Emergency Credit Open to Greek Banks

 

 

 

 

The headquarters of the European Central Bank (ECB) is pictured in Frankfurt, Germany, June 28, 2015.

The headquarters of the European Central Bank (ECB) is pictured in Frankfurt, Germany, June 28, 2015.

 

The European Central Bank said Sunday it is keeping its emergency credit lines open to Greek banks even as Greek depositors are standing in long lines at automated teller machines to withdraw their savings.

 

The decision keeps open a financial lifeline to Athens, but does not provide more money.

 

The central bank said it could reconsider its funding, but there was no hint of a resolution in the standoff between Greece and its international creditors. Greece is balking at new austerity demands the lenders are seeking in exchange for release of an $8 billion segment of its long-running bailout that expires Tuesday.

 

Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis suggested that Athens might not pay $1.8 billion its owes the International Monetary Fund on Tuesday. He said the central bank, another of Greece's lenders, profited on Greek bonds in 2014 and ought to simply transfer the money to the IMF to cover the loan payment.

 

FILE - Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis talks to IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde (R) during a eurozone finance ministers meeting in Luxembourg, June 18, 2015.
FILE - Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis talks to IMF Managing Director Christine Lagarde (R) during a eurozone finance ministers meeting in Luxembourg, June 18, 2015.

 

ECB President Mario Draghi said the central bank is working closely with the Bank of Greece to maintain financial stability. But Greek depositors, worried that government officials are about to impose withdrawal limits, lined up at ATMs to get cash. Some machines ran out of cash, but others were being replenished.

 

"We are all worried because I have stopped at 10 ATMs and I can't withdraw 100 euros," said one depositor. "This is what I see. Now we found here one, maybe, I do not know if it will give us something, so we can take some money to see what will happen in the next few days."

 

The Greek government scheduled an emergency meeting for later Sunday on whether to impose the limits.

 

Parliament approves bailout referendum

 

Meanwhile, the Greek parliament voted Sunday in favor of a request by Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras’ government for a July 5 referendum on the terms of the international bailout deal that the lenders want Greece to accept.  

 

Tsipras said “the people must decide free of any blackmail,” but the government is urging a "no" vote unless the terms are changed. The lenders' proposal calls for further Greek pension cuts as a condition of releasing the bailout money.

 

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras (bottom R) acknowledges applause during a parliamentary session in Athens, Greece, June 28, 2015.
Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras (bottom R) acknowledges applause during a parliamentary session in Athens, Greece, June 28, 2015.

 

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls warned there is a "real risk" of Greece leaving the 19-nation eurozone if Greek voters say "no" to the bailout proposals in the referendum.  

 

Valls, however, refused to denounce the Greek government's decision to hold the referendum.  "When you ask the people to decide, to exercise their democratic right, this should not be criticized," he said.

 

Valls said he continues to believe "that a deal is possible" and he invited the Greek government "to return to the negotiating table."

 

Greece hurtled closer to a eurozone exit Saturday when Europe refused to extend the bailout program.

 

Greek authorities Friday unilaterally ended negotiations to extend the financial assistance and instead called for the referendum.

 

Eurozone chief Jeroen Dijsselbloem said ending talks “is a sad decision for Greece.”

 

 

 

 

Greece Submits Draft Bailout Plan, Creditors Say Not Enough

 

 

 

 

Greece has submitted a proposal for an agreement with its bailout creditors, the prime minister said Tuesday, as the country seeks a deal that will unlock desperately needed rescue money.
 
Alexis Tspiras said it was now up to the leaders of Europe, who are Greece's main creditors, to accept a deal or risk potentially disastrous consequences for the region.
 
But the European Union said the sides were "not there yet.''
 
Without more rescue loans, Greece could default on its debts this month and eventually even drop out of Europe's currency bloc, a step that would push Europe and the global economy into uncharted territory.
 
 "It is now clear that the decision for whether they want to adapt to realism and emerge from the crisis without the division of Europe ... belongs to the political leadership of Europe,'' Tsipras said.
 
 For four months, Greece and its creditors have been locked in a standoff over what reforms the country needs to make to get more loans.
 
Tsipras gave no specifics of what was included in the proposal, which he said was submitted Monday night to the European Central Bank, International Monetary Fund and European Commission, the EU's executive.
 
That same night, the leaders of Germany, France, the IMF, ECB and European Commission held an emergency meeting about Greece in Berlin. It was unclear whether Greece had submitted its proposal before the leaders met.
 
EU spokeswoman Mina Andreeva said Tuesday that Greece and its creditors still needed to do more work to reach a deal.
 
"The main message is that we are not there yet,'' she said.
 
Time is of the essence. Greece must repay a total of about 1.6 billion euros ($1.8 billion) to the IMF this month, with the first installment of 303 million euros due Friday.
 
It is uncertain whether Greece has the money to pay Friday's debt unless it gets a deal with creditors that will unlock the final 7.2 billion euros ($8 billion) of its five-year bailout program.
 
Greece has survived without rescue loans since last summer. As cash ran out in recent weeks, it managed to repay its debts by scraping together reserves from state enterprises, including embassies abroad and schools.
 
There have been suggestions Greece could seek to bundle all the money it owes the IMF this month into one payment on June 30 — an option permitted under IMF rules but rarely used. Taking that route could buy more time to secure a deal with creditors, although Athens has not indicated it is considering it.
 
Tsipras' government, a coalition of his radical left Syriza party and a small nationalist party, was elected in January on promises of repealing the deeply resented budget austerity measures that have accompanied its bailout.
 
Tsipras said Greece's proposals included concessions.
 
"We have made concessions because a compromise requires concessions,'' Tsipras said. "We know these concessions will be difficult but we have submitted a realistic proposal for Greece's exit from the crisis.''
 
Speaking earlier in the day, Labor Minister Panos Skourletis said Athens had given as much ground as it could. "I believe the Greek government has made the maximum level of concessions — there is no margin left. No margin,'' he said on Skai television.  
 
Europe's Economics and Financial Affairs Commissioner Pierre Moscovici said during an interview with France Inter radio on Tuesday that talks were fruitful, though there was more work to be done.

He said progress had been made on reforms to value added tax and the establishment of an independent tax agency, as well as administration reform, non-performing loans and pensions.
 
He indicated that talks could continue past Friday, however.
 
"In the few weeks that are coming up we have to find a solution,'' Moscovici said.
 
Speaking earlier, Deputy Prime Minister Yannis Dragasakis said Greece was "ready to respond to whatever is asked of it'' to reach an agreement, but that Athens would not accept an ultimatum from its creditors.
 
Tsipras has also faced criticism from hardliners from within his party, who believe Syriza must stick to its pre-election pledges.
 
Some have suggested Greece not repay debts if the country's creditors don't back down from the issues the government considers its red lines — namely cuts to salaries and pensions.

 

 

 

 

US Acknowledges Unsuccessful Syria Rescue Attempt

 

 

 

 

 

President Barack Obama arrives to speak in Edgartown, Mass., Aug. 20, 2014, about the killing of American journalist James Foley by militants with the Islamic State extremist group.

President Barack Obama arrives to speak in Edgartown, Mass., Aug. 20, 2014, about the killing of American journalist James Foley by militants with the Islamic State extremist group.

 

The United States acknowledged Wednesday it launched an unsuccessful military rescue operation earlier this year to free American hostages held by Islamic State (IS) militants in Syria. The announcement came the same day President Barack Obama condemned the execution of an American journalist and called for regional action to extract the IS extremist "cancer" before it spreads.

 

Pentagon spokesman Rear Admiral John Kirby said the United States attempted to rescue a number of American hostages held by “a particular captor network” within IS in Syria. He said the air and ground operation was not successful because the hostages were not present at the targeted location. 

 

Presidential assistant on counterterrorism Lisa Monaco said the operation, which took place earlier this summer, was authorized by Obama because of the assessment that the hostages were in increasing danger with each passing day.

 

Pentagon acknowledgement

Rick Brennan, senior RAND Corporation political scientist and career U.S. Army officer, said gaining actionable intelligence for such an operation is always a challenge, but he is surprised the Pentagon acknowledged the unsuccessful mission publicly.

 

"Trying to get current intelligence for this type of operation is extremely difficult.  We had so many attempts that were aborted, if you will, with bin Laden. Very rarely do you hear about the Department of Defense discussing these types of capabilities. So, yeah, it is odd that the Pentagon and the White House have come out and acknowledged that we conducted this kind of raid, and that it failed," Brennan said.

 

FILE - This undated file still image from video released April 7, 2011, by GlobalPost, shows James Foley of Rochester, N.H., a freelance contributor for GlobalPost, in Benghazi, Libya.
FILE - This undated file still image from video released April 7, 2011, by GlobalPost, shows James Foley of Rochester, N.H., a freelance contributor for GlobalPost, in Benghazi, Libya.

 

The Pentagon and White House statements were issued the same day Obama acknowledged the beheading of American freelance journalist James Foley seen in a gruesome video made public Tuesday. He said the world is appalled by the brutal murder and denounced the group’s acts of murder, abductions, torture, rape and slavery.

 

"From governments and peoples across the Middle East, there has to be a common effort to extract this cancer, so that it does not spread. There has to be a clear rejection of these kinds of nihilistic ideologies," Obama said.

 

The president said there is no place for IS militants in the 21st century.

 

IS threat

U.S. State Department spokeswoman Marie Harf Wednesday said Washington has spoken with a number of regional partners who understand how serious a threat IS poses.

 

"Countries in the region are very, very concerned about this. We’ve worked with them to cut off financing [of IS], working to cut off the flow of foreign fighters, so we can start to deprive ISIL of the oxygen that it’s had and has really allowed it to flourish," said Harf.

 

Interpol says the beheading of a U.S. journalist by Islamic State militants shows the need for a coordinated global effort to combat the threat posed by foreign fighters traveling to conflict zones in the Middle East.

 

The group said Thursday the killing of James Foley has appalled the world and illustrates the "depravity" of the Islamic State fighters operating in Iraq and Syria.

 

But terrorism expert Greg Barton, who heads the Center for Islam and Modern World at Australia’s Monash University, said the terrorist threat continues to grow in the region and IS continues to add fighters to its ranks.

 

"We used to think that had maybe 6,000 militants in Iraq and a similar number in Syria. We’re now seeing multiples of that number. We do know that many more foreign fighters have come in over the last few weeks and we know that they’re recruiting locally as well, and it looks as if they have some core strength in the several tens of thousands," said Barton.

 

Provocation

Barton said the brutal execution of Foley is designed to provoke an angry response from the West, and that may be a way for the Sunni extremist group to tell would-be donors and recruits that the world is at war with Islam. So far, he added, the Western response has been restrained.

 

Despite militant threats to kill another captive American journalist, Steven Sotloff, over U.S. aerial attacks on IS targets in Iraq, those air strikes continued Wednesday with another 14 in the vicinity of the recently recaptured Mosul Dam.  Brennan said the United States has little choice but to continue its aerial campaign in support of Iraqi and Iraqi Kurdish operations against IS.

 

"If you fail to take action, because of a terrorist threat, then it binds your hands to do the kinds of things that protect U.S. interests. I think that it’s absolutely impossible for the president to try to back down and not do what he thinks is right because of the threat of an American being killed," said Brennan.

 

Writing Wednesday in Commentary magazine, Council on Foreign Relations national security expert Max Boot said what is needed now is a coherent military strategy to annihilate IS. He said that would include an enhanced air campaign coupled with thousands of U.S. advisors and special operations troops working with moderate forces in Syria and Iraq to root out IS militants from their newly-conquered territory.

 

 

 

 

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